Baolis of Delhi (Archive)

Baoli at Red Fort

14th Century step-well inside the red fort built by Shah Jahan in the 17th Century

‎”The discovery of a Tughlak era baoli in the Red Fort has been the subject of much debate. How come a 14th Century step-well exists in a fort built by Shah Jahan in the 17th Century? Baffling for some but it must be remembered that the Red Fort was built on the ruins of an old Afghan fort. The area, though unpopulated in pre-Moghul days, was nevertheless not devoid of fortifications. There must have been an earlier fortification at the site erected by the Tughlaks, who built many baolis in Delhi.”
~ R V Smith

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Hazrat Nizamuddin ki Baoli

This baoli at Nizamuddin (west) was built by Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya in the years 1321-22; it has a dargah attached to it and many pilgrims consider its water as holy, it is a major convergence point during the annual urs. It is also a Baoli with active underground springs of soft water.

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Baoli at R K Puram

‎15th Century baoli built by Lodis, on the ridge forest to help the travelers who visited the tomb and villagers of Munirka, now situated at R K Puram Sector 5

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Agrasen Ki Baoli

Located at a walking distance from CP; Origin of Agrasen ki baoli is still not known, by some it is believed to be built by Maharaja Agrasen (who was a king during Mahabharat time), but the architecture of the baoli give clues that it must have been (re)built during Tughlaq period (14th Century) by agarwal community. Amazingly the Baoli consists of 2 tanks, one in the front of bathing purposes and one hidden behind for storing drinking water.

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Baoli at Feroz Shah Kotla

This is the baoli at the ruins of the 14th century city of Feroz Shah Kotla and it is towards the north of the fort opposite to the Ashokan pillar. Unlike more common baolis this does not have steps leading all the way to the water level, instead a complex pulley system with pipes and channels are there. The circular structure with rooms has often been referred to as a summer retreat for the nobility.

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Baoli at Old Fort

This narrow 22 meters deep baoli with 89 steps spaced with 8 landings is located at Old Fort, believed to be the site of mythological town of Indraprastha.

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Baoli at Tughlaqabad

Archaeologists say that there are more than 5 baolis at Tughlaqabad (built in 1321), but the one shown here is within the royal premise…… The baoli has dried up and most striking features are its rectangular shape and dog legged stair….

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Gandhak Ki Baoli

This 13th Century Gandhak Ki Baoli at Mehrauli was built by slave dynasty ruler Iltutmish who constructed this baolil to provide a continuous flow of water to the Mehrauli village. It is the oldest Baoli in Delhi and still in use by the local residents!

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Rajaon ki Baoli

This magnificent structure with a tomb and mosque attached is Rajaon ki Baoli, now situated in Mehrauli Archaeological Park. This five level Baoli was built in 1516 by Daulat Khan.

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Baoli at Northern Ridge

This is the Baoli at Hindu Rao Hospital, built in 1354 AD by Feroz Shah Tughlaq, for water supply to his hunting lodge .

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Qutab Sahib ki Baoli

Qutub Sahib ki baoli is located at Mehrauli inside the Dargah of Qutub ul Aqtab Hazrat Khwaja Syed Muhammad Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki, a Sufi saint and  the spiritual successor of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti.

Qutab Sahib’s dargah is the oldest sufi dargah in Delhi.

Even though the origins of this deep spring of water is not known, but the structures around it were erected in 1846 by Bahadur Shah Zafar’s loyals. This well is referred to as Qutub Sahib ki baoli by locals.

Currently the baoli, is covered on all sides and is hardly visible. Though referred to as sacred by the visitors of the dargah, but still used as a dump bin.

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